Book Review | The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

Updated: Jul 11

Birth place and date of Charles Duhigg: 1974, New Mexico, USA


The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg - 2012

Charles Duhigg; the author of The Power of Habit, about the science of habit formation in our lives, companies and societies, and Smarter Faster Better, about the science of productivity. He was a reporter at the New York Times for a decade, writing such series as “The iEconomy” which focused on Apple and won a Pulitzer prize for explanatory reporting in 2013.


Also a native of New Mexico Charles Duhigg, studied history at Yale and received an MBA from Harvard Business School. He has appeared on This American Life, N.P.R., The Newshour with Jim Lehrer, and Frontline. Before becoming a journalist, he worked in private equity and was a bike messenger in San Francisco.


Currently, Charles Duhigg write books and magazine articles for The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker and The Atlantic.



The Power of Habit is the book that changed my life. After I read this I changed my habit of watching series with reading books and I've been reading ever since. That's why this book has an import place in my library.

The Power of Habits begins with anecdotal accounts of people who changed destructive habits in their lives and one account of a man who had absolutely no short term memory, and continious with other creatures under research so details in this book mostly based on resulted researches and scientific experiments.

If you have a bad addiction or anything you want to change in your life, I recommend you to read "The Power of Habit" by Charles Duhigg. Think of it as an ongoing conversation where you can share updates about business, trends, news, and more.



“Change might not be fast and it isn't always easy. But with time and effort, almost any habit can be reshaped.” /Charles Duhigg
“If you believe you can change – if you make it a habit – the change becomes real.” /Charles Duhigg
“Simply giving employees a sense of agency- a feeling that they are in control, that they have genuine decision-making authority – can radically increase how much energy and focus they bring to their jobs.” /Charles Duhigg
“This is how willpower becomes a habit: by choosing a certain behavior ahead of time, and then following that routine when an inflection point arrives.” /Charles Duhigg
“Champions don’t do extraordinary things. They do ordinary things, but they do them without thinking, too fast for the other team to react. They follow the habits they’ve learned.” /Charles Duhigg

“The best agencies understood the importance of routines. The worst agencies were headed by people who never thought about it, and then wondered why no one followed their orders.”

“The best agencies understood the importance of routines. The worst agencies were headed by people who never thought about it, and then wondered why no one followed their orders.” /Charles Duhigg
Habits are powerful, but delicate. They can emerge outside our consciousness, or can be deliberately designed. Habits often occur without our permission, but can be reshaped by fiddling with their parts. They shape our lives far more than we realize—they are so strong, in fact, that they cause our brains to cling to them at the exclusion of all else, including common sense.” /Charles Duhigg
“If you want to do something that requires willpower, like going for a run after work, you have to conserve your willpower muscle during the day.” /Charles Duhigg
“The Golden Rule of Habit Change: You can't extinguish a bad habit, you can only change it.” /Charles Duhigg
“But to change an old habit, you must address an old craving. You have to keep the same cues and rewards as before, and feed the craving by inserting a new routine.” /Charles Duhigg


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