Book Review | Fantastic Night by Stefan Zweig

Updated: Jun 25

Birth: November 28, 1881, Austria

Death: February 22, 1942, Brazil


Fantastic Night by Stefan Zweig - 1922

Stefan Zweig was born in 1881 in Vienna, Austria. In addition to being a novelist; was also a playwright, journalist and biography writer. His recognition in the world of literature provided with stories like The Burning Secret, Chess, Fear, Amok, Confusion...


I would like to share with you today; Twenty-Four Hours in the Life of a Woman by Stefan Zweig



This is the second novel of Stefan Zweig I've read, the first being "Chess", and to be honest, I was not as amazed as before. But I must admit I really liked this one too.

In fact, I'm not sure how certain I should be about this because the reason why I didn't like this as much as the Chess can be the very reason why this novel is indeed so amazing: I didn't enjoy this book as much as I could, because I was obviously looking for a more interesting set of events on the "fantastic night".

Apparently, Stefan Zweig didn't think so and he has written only a few ethical sins, a decent criminal act and at last a few good deeds that lead the narrator to a euphoria.

Perhaps, this is the greatness of this book rather than a weakness: We do not need very interesting occasions to achieve enlightenment or awakening.



“Ambition had never troubled me, so I decided to begin by watching life at my leisure for a few years, waiting until I finally felt tempted to find some circle of influence for myself.” /Stefan Zweig
“A well-chosen tie could make me almost merry; a good book, an excursion in a motor car or an hour with a woman left me fully satisfied. It particularly pleased me to ensure that this way of life, like a faultlessly correct suit of English tailoring, did not make me conspicuous in any way. I believe I was considered pleasant company, I was popular and welcome in society, and most who knew me called me a happy man.” /Stefan Zweig

“Memory is always a bond, and every loving memory is a bond twice over.”

A tall, black-bearded man, who can hardly be more than thirty years old, stands at the door. He quickly divests himself of the scarves and coats in which he had been muffled up against the cold, and as soon as his face is revealed in the faint light of that last little flickering candle flame, Lea runs to him and embraces him./Stefan Zweig
He stops for a moment. Then he says, in a firmer voice, "But enough of all that now! First of all, what shall we do?" The answer comes from all sides. "Escape!"—"We must get away!"—"Over the border to Poland..."./Stefan Zweig
Nothing makes one as healthy as happiness, and there is no greater happiness than making someone else happy./Stefan Zweig

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