Book Review | Amok by Stefan Zweig

Updated: Jul 28

Birth: November 28, 1881, Austria

Death: February 22, 1942, Brazil


Amok by Stefan Zweig - 1922

Stefan Zweig was born in 1881 in Vienna, Austria. In addition to being a novelist; was also a playwright, journalist and biography writer. His recognition in the world of literature provided with stories like The Burning Secret, Chess, Fear, Amok, Confusion...


I would like to share with you today; Twenty-Four Hours in the Life of a Woman by Stefan Zweig.



It is quite impressive just how much Stephan Zweig has packed into his 1922 novella, Amok, in just over 60 pages. The Turkish version I read was translated from the original German in 2014 by Nafer Ermiş. This is the intense and compelling story of a man 'running amok', the result of a brief but highly charged encounter with a mystery woman. On a ship travelling from India to Europe, the narrator meets a cautious man, a doctor who until recently had been serving in a remote village in the Dutch East Indies, who shares his tragic and disturbing tale during the night, while the other passengers sleep. The majority of the narrative is the doctor's story, while the narrator provides a setting and context for the conversation. I will say nothing of the circumstances of the doctor's revelations to avoid any plot spoilers. But this is a gripping, masterful tale from a writer in peak form, who understands that fiction does not necessarily require 100 pages or more to be intelligent, un-put-downable and genuinely brilliant. Zweig is a master of the short story...



“... and above me, with an imperceptible resonance, the white flow of this world.”
“I thought right away, if they were giving an advance, it must have been a clean job, I knew that the tombstones were multiplying three times faster than ours on these fiery lands, but when one is young, he thinks that fire and death will always bounce on others.” /Stefan Zweig


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