21 Inspiring Books to Start 2021 with New Habits and Interests

After a long tough year, we have come to 2021 and a lot has changed in this process. Some sectors were badly affected, some benefited, and apart from these, products and software that we do not need in our lives have become tools we use every day.


Zoom Microsoft Teams Google Meets

These situations have created concerns about the future sectors in everyone's minds. And it was supposed to be, because most people are still unaware of the problems or benefits that the age they are in can cause. We are in the information age ever since the Internet is accessible to all humanity, and the fact that the information age will surpass and even eliminate almost all of the ideas and methods that have persisted for centuries was only postponed. But most people is not even aware of the situation.


However, COVID-19 has accelerated this process and even forced online methods to be used worldwide in 10 years. Since we started practicing them, we have gradually started to understand what is necessary and what is not, and we can all understand that some professions are coming to an end. Just as in 1645 when Blaise Pascal invented the calculator of space, he removed the importance of being able to do fast mathematical calculations, now with the information age, the professions that most people have done for centuries are coming to an end.


Blaise Pascal First Calculator

If a person falls into this situation and his profession is no longer important, his only way of salvation will be whether he is versatile or not, as you can imagine. The versatility that I mentioned can also provide a person only by evaluating the future and turning to the appropriate areas.


This is exactly why I have listed 21 books that can be grasped by even a person who has no knowledge of the aforementioned field, whereby they can acquire new habits, passive income generating hobbies and skills. Now, if you are ready, let's examine these books together.


Books as Stairs

21. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari


How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children?


Yuval Noah Harari's 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into today's most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future.


As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.


20. Market Wizards by Jack D. Schwager


This classic interview-style investment text from a financial expert is a must-read for traders and professional financiers alike, as well as anyone interested in gaining insight into how the world of finance really works.


Filled with anecdotes about market experiences, including the story of a trader who after wiping out several times, turned $30,000 into $80 million and an electrical engineer from MIT whose computerized trading has earned returns of 250,000 percent over sixteen years. Identifies the factors that define a successful trader.





19. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg


In The Power of Habit, award-winning New York Times business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed.


With penetrating intelligence and an ability to distill vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives, Duhigg brings to life a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential for transformation.


The review of The Power of Habit is currently available on our website, for those wondering: Book Review | The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg





18. Mindset by Carol Dweck


After decades of research, world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol S. Dweck, PhD., discovered a simple but groundbreaking idea: the power of mindset.


In this brilliant book, she shows how success in school, work, sports, the arts, and almost every area of human endeavor can be dramatically influenced by how we think about our talents and abilities.


People with a fixed mindset — those who believe that abilities are fixed — are less likely to flourish than those with a growth mindset — those who believe that abilities can be developed.


Mindset reveals how great parents, teachers, managers, and athletes can put this idea to use to foster outstanding accomplishment.


17. Rework by David Heinemeier Hansson and Jason Fried


Rework shows you a better, faster, easier way to succeed in business. Read it and you'll know why plans are actually harmful, why you don't need outside investors, and why you're better off ignoring the competition.


The truth is, you need less than you think. You don't need to be a workaholic. You don't need to staff up.


You don't need to waste time on paperwork or meetings. You don't even need an office. Those are all just excuses.







16. Martin Eden by Jack London


The semi-autobiographical Martin Eden is the most vital and original character Jack London ever created.


Set in San Francisco, this is the story of Martin Eden, an impoverished seaman who pursues, obsessively and aggressively, dreams of education and literary fame.


The review of the Martin Eden is currently available on our website, for those wondering: Book Review | Martin Eden by Jack London












15. The One Thing by Gary W. Keller and Jay Papasan


The One Thing explains the success habit to overcome the six lies that block our success, beat the seven thieves that steal time, and leverage the laws of purpose, priority, and productivity.




















14. Good to Great by Jim Collins


To find the keys to greatness, Collins's 21-person research team read and coded 6,000 articles, generated more than 2,000 pages of interview transcripts and created 384 megabytes of computer data in a five-year project.


The findings will surprise many readers and, quite frankly, upset others.














13. The Art of the Start by Guy Kawasaki


A new product, a new service, a new company, a new division, a new organization, a new anything—where there’s a will, here’s the way. It begins with a dream that just won’t quit, the once-in-a-lifetime thunderbolt of pure inspiration, the obsession, the world-beater, the killer app, the next big thing. Everyone who wants to make the world a better place becomes possessed by a grand idea.


But what does it take to turn your idea into action? Whether you are an entrepreneur, intrapreneur, or not-for-profit crusader, there’s no shortage of advice available on issues such as writing a business plan, recruiting, raising capital, and branding. In fact, there are so many books, articles, and Web sites that many startups get bogged down to the point of paralysis. Or else they focus on the wrong priorities and go broke before they discover their mistakes. In The Art of the Start, Guy Kawasaki brings two decades of experience as one of business’s most original and irreverent strategists to offer the essential guide for anyone starting anything, from a multinational corporation to a church group.


12. Beating the Street by Peter Lynch


Legendary money manager Peter Lynch explains his own strategies for investing and offers advice for how to pick stocks and mutual funds to assemble a successful investment portfolio.


An important key to investing, Lynch says, is to remember that stocks are not lottery tickets. There’s a company behind every stock and a reason companies—and their stocks—perform the way they do. In this book, Peter Lynch shows you how you can become an expert in a company and how you can build a profitable investment portfolio, based on your own experience and insights and on straightforward do-it-yourself research.


In Beating the Street, Lynch for the first time explains how to devise a mutual fund strategy, shows his step-by-step strategies for picking stock, and describes how the individual investor can improve his or her investment performance to rival that of the experts.


11. Meditations by Marcus Aurelius


Written in Greek by the only Roman emperor who was also a philosopher, without any intention of publication, the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius offer a remarkable series of challenging spiritual reflections and exercises developed as the emperor struggled to understand himself and make sense of the universe.


While the Meditations were composed to provide personal consolation and encouragement, Marcus Aurelius also created one of the greatest of all works of philosophy: a timeless collection that has been consulted and admired by statesmen, thinkers and readers throughout the centuries.






10. Willpower by John Tierney and Roy Baumeister


One of the world's most esteemed and influential psychologists, Roy F. Baumeister, teams with New York Times science writer John Tierney to reveal the secrets of self-control and how to master it.


In Willpower, the pioneering researcher Roy F. Baumeister collaborates with renowned New York Times science writer John Tierney to revolutionize our understanding of the most coveted human virtue: self-control.










9. Zero to One by Peter Thiel


If you want to build a better future, you must believe in secrets.The great secret of our time is that there are still uncharted frontiers to explore and new inventions to create. In Zero to One, legendary entrepreneur and investor Peter Thiel shows how we can find singular ways to create those new things.


Thiel begins with the contrarian premise that we live in an age of technological stagnation, even if we’re too distracted by shiny mobile devices to notice. Information technology has improved rapidly, but there is no reason why progress should be limited to computers or Silicon Valley. Progress can be achieved in any industry or area of business. It comes from the most important skill that every leader must master: learning to think for yourself.


Doing what someone else already knows how to do takes the world from 1 to n, adding more of something familiar. But when you do something new, you go from 0 to 1. The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won’t make a search engine. Tomorrow’s champions will not win by competing ruthlessly in today’s marketplace. They will escape competition altogether, because their businesses will be unique.


Zero to One presents at once an optimistic view of the future of progress in America and a new way of thinking about innovation: it starts by learning to ask the questions that lead you to find value in unexpected places.


8. Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell


In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of outliers; the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different?


His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing.


Along the way he explains the secrets of software billionaires, what it takes to be a great soccer player, why Asians are good at math, and what made the Beatles the greatest rock band.



7. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey


When Stephen Covey first released The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, the book became an instant rage because people suddenly got up and took notice that their lives were headed off in the wrong direction; and more than that, they realized that there were so many simple things they could do in order to navigate their life correctly.


This book was wonderful education for people, education in how to live life effectively and get closer to the ideal of being a ‘success’ in life.









6. Mini Habits by Stephen Guise


Mini Habits will better equip you to change your life than 99% of the people you see walking around on this globe.


People so often think that they are the reason they can't achieve lasting change; but the problem isn't with them—it's with their strategy. You can achieve great things without the guilt, intimidation, and repeated failure associated with such strategies such as "getting motivated," resolutions, or even "just doing it.”


To make changes last, you need to stop fighting against your brain. When you start playing by your brain's rules—as mini habits show you how to do—lasting change isn't so hard.



5. Make It Stick by Peter C. Brown, Mark A. McDaniel and Henry L. Roediger


Drawing on cognitive psychology and other fields, Make It Stick offers techniques for becoming more productive learners, and cautions against study habits and practice routines that turn out to be counterproductive.


The book speaks to students, teachers, trainers, athletes, and all those interested in lifelong learning and self-improvement.












4. Drive by Daniel H. Pink


Most people believe that the best way to motivate is with rewards like money—the carrot-and-stick approach. That's a mistake, says Daniel H. Pink. In this provocative and persuasive new book, he asserts that the secret to high performance and satisfaction-at work, at school, and at home—is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.


Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does—and how that affects every aspect of life.


He examines the three elements of true motivation—autonomy, mastery, and purpose-and offers smart and surprising techniques for putting these into action in a unique book that will change how we think and transform how we live.


3. Start with Why by Simon Sinek


Why are some people and organizations more innovative, more influential, and more profitable than others? Why do some command greater loyalty from customers and employees alike? Even among the successful, why are so few able to repeat their success over and over?


People like Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, and the Wright Brothers might have little in common, but they all started with why. It was their natural ability to start with why that enabled them to inspire those around them and to achieve remarkable things.


In studying the leaders who've had the greatest influence in the world, Simon Sinek discovered that they all think, act, and communicate in the exact same way—and it's the complete opposite of what everyone else does. Sinek calls this powerful idea The Golden Circle, and it provides a framework upon which organizations can be built, movements can be lead, and people can be inspired. And it all starts with WHY.


2. The Lean Startup by Eric Ries


Most startups fail. But many of those failures are preventable. The Lean Startup is a new approach being adopted across the globe, changing the way companies are built and new products are launched.


Eric Ries defines a startup as an organization dedicated to creating something new under conditions of extreme uncertainty. This is just as true for one person in a garage or a group of seasoned professionals in a Fortune 500 boardroom. What they have in common is a mission to penetrate that fog of uncertainty to discover a successful path to a sustainable business.


The Lean Startup approach fosters companies that are both more capital efficient and that leverage human creativity more effectively. Inspired by lessons from lean manufacturing, it relies on "validated learning," rapid scientific experimentation, as well as a number of counter-intuitive practices that shorten product development cycles, measure actual progress without resorting to vanity metrics, and learn what customers really want. It enables a company to shift directions with agility, altering plans inch by inch, minute by minute.


1. The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham


The greatest investment advisor of the twentieth century, Benjamin Graham taught and inspired people worldwide.


Graham's philosophy of "value investing" which shields investors from substantial error and teaches them to develop long-term strategies has made The Intelligent Investor the stock market bible ever since its original publication in 1949.


Vital and indispensable, The Intelligent Investor, is the most important book you will ever read on how to reach your financial goals.







And in addition to this list, I want to add another book that I think will give a great motivation with reverse psychology.


0. Oblomov by Ivan Goncharov


The novel evolved and expanded from an 1849 short story or sketch entitled "Oblomov's Dream". The novel focuses on the midlife crisis of the main character, Ilya Ilyich Oblomov, an upper middle class son of a member of Russia's nineteenth century landed gentry. Oblomov's distinguishing characteristic is his slothful attitude towards life. While a common negative characteristic, Oblomov raises this trait to an art form, conducting his little daily business apathetically from his bed.


While clearly comedic, the novel also seriously examines many critical issues that faced Russian society in the nineteenth century. Some of these problems included the uselessness of landowners and gentry in a feudal society that did not encourage innovation or reform, the complex relations between members of different classes of society such as Oblomov's relationship with his servant Zakhar, and courtship and matrimony by the elite.


The review of the Oblomov is currently available on our website, for those wondering: Book Review | Oblomov by Ivan Goncharov

Recent Posts

See All

Subscribe to our newsletter

If you want to be the first to know about the newly published posts, subscribe!

Thanks for submitting!

Take a seat and find best books to read. Useful Addiction Book Blog is the place where readers and book recommendations meet.